Lyme Disease Prevention Part 2: What To Do If You Get Bit

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As we transition into the summer months and increase our outdoor activities, it is easy to forget about the need to protect ourselves and our families from a common but serious health threat: Lyme disease and other tick-borne illnesses. Thankfully, as discussed in the previous article Lyme Disease Prevention Part 1: How to Avoid Getting Bit” (as outlined by Dr. Myriah Hinchey, Lyme Literate Naturopathic Doctor, Founder/Medical Director of Tao Vitality LLC, and co-founder of LymeCore Botanicals) there are practical and simple ways to reduce the chances of getting bit and subsequently contracting Lyme disease and other co-infections that can have damaging long-term effects. And if you do get bit, taking proactive measures to quickly address a potential or active infection can be done using proven natural methods, often in conjunction with more conventional approaches.  

With Covid-19 concerns still lingering for an undetermined amount of time, optimizing health is on everyone’s mind. Time outside getting adequate sunshine/vitamin D, fresh air, and exercise are vital to immune function and overall well-being, but what do we do if preventative measures for Lyme fail and we suddenly find a tick embedded in our skin?

There is a much better chance of avoiding acute and chronic Lyme disease if the tick is removed properly, if the pathogenic status of the tick is determined through testing, and if preventative measures are taken and symptoms are identified effectively within a critical time period after getting bit.

This approach can help to prevent an active infection and determine a treatment protocol should the tick contain the Lyme disease-causing bacterial spirochete, borrelia burgdorferi, and/or other co-infections.  Important recommendations to follow if you get a tick bite include:

The #1 recommendation: The most important thing to keep in mind if you find an embedded tick on your skin is to avoid irritating, suffocating, or doing anything to causes the tick to pull its head out of your body. If it does, it will regurgitate its contents -- including the Lyme-causing bacteria -- back into you.

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A Naturopathic Approach to Lyme Disease: Interview with Dr. Christie Morelli

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Dr. Christie Morelli, Board Certified Naturopathic Physician at TAO Vitality in Hebron CT, discusses Tao’s naturopathic treatment options for Lyme Disease and co-infections, and how they are different from the conventional medical approach. Dr. Morelli shares how she became passionate about Lyme Disease, some of the challenges and stigmas attached to treating tick-borne illness, and what to do if you suspect you may have Lyme disease or are suffering from ongoing symptoms.

 

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Lyme Disease Interview with Dr. Keith Yimoyines

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Dr. Keith Yimoyines, a naturopathic physician at TAO Vitality in Hebron CT, sits with TAO's Functional Nutritionist Carly Sage to discuss the unique approach he and other doctors at TAO rely on for treating Lyme Disease and co-infections that are common in Connecticut. However, this topic is not just of interest for us New Englanders. In fact, Lyme...
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Lyme Disease Prevention Part 1: How to Avoid Getting Bit

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In Connecticut, we have all heard of Lyme Disease, most of us have a fear of getting it, and many of us have experienced it firsthand. Lyme Disease has been called a silent epidemic, with CDC statistics citing that its prevalence is greater than breast cancer. However, if you think Lyme Disease is limited to our native New England area, think again...
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Two New Tick Types Found In Connecticut Spark Concern Over Lyme and Tick-borne Disease for 2020 Season

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Dr. Keith Yimoyines, ND Spring is upon us, which in Connecticut means sunshine, warmer, longer days, and unfortunately, ticks. Data from the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station (CAES), released in a recent report, with funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), indicates that 2019 was a particularly bad year for tick...
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